Making dreams reality

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Imagine a future where all your dreams come true, every little thing that you wished you could do in life happened. Now, this could be you but only if you actively look for ways to achieve those dreams of yours.

Rushing things along won’t pay off in the long run. Instead of jumping head first into something new a person needs to make it so they can live off of their side jobs just in case this new job does not turn out the way they want it to. This is a strategy called “building a bridge” that comes from the Jeff Goin’s book “The Art of Work: A Proven Path to Discovering What You Were Meant to Do.”

Class of 2004 graduate, Chris Schoenberg, a full-time YouTuber from the Stockbridge-Chelsea area, was able to find and pursue his dream job. But, it has not always been like this for him. “It was a lot of work getting where I am,” Schoenberg said. “I had to basically work 2 full time jobs when I first started off.”

Although Schoenberg had earned his degree in finance from Davenport University, his current profession deals with subjects like woodworking and home improvement. 

Schoenberg is not alone in this dual life. Only about 27 percent of college graduates get a job related to their major according to Jaison Abel and Richard Dietz of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

Students are most times encouraged to get a secondary degree, but it does not always work out that way. David Walker works as the chief engineer at Oakland Hills Country Club; most days you’ll find him at meetings or managing a group of around 20 people.  

Walker did not attend college and thinks that people do not need a post-secondary education in order to follow their dream careers. “I knew that college would not give me the opportunity that I wanted for a career,” Walker said. Instead, he thinks a dream job can be achieved through learning from mistakes and hard work. 

The average person tends to change their career 5-7 times during one’s working life according to Career Advice Online.

If you don’t know what you want to do in life ask yourself what would you be doing if money was not something to worry about? Noted philosopher Alan Watts asked this question in a famous essay.

Is there anything that you love doing even though it is not doing anything for you? You could basically take money out of the equation entirely and you might just find what you’re looking for. 

“If you say that getting the money is the most important thing, you’ll spend your life completely wasting your time. You’ll be doing things you don’t like doing in order to go on living, that is to go on doing things you don’t like doing,” Watts said.